Archive for the ‘Entertainment’ Category

Ugly Duckling Presse’s Swedish Authors & Translators
August 19, 2008

SPECIAL EVENT: UDP Swedish Authors and Translators

Sat., Oct. 25th @ 6 p.m. – Stain Bar – Williamsburg, Brooklyn

** Johannes Göransson, Fredrik Nyberg, and Jennifer Hayashida**

~~~~~

Johannes Göransson is the co-editor of the press Action Books and the online journal Action, Yes. He is the translator of Remainland: Selected Poems of Aase Berg and Ideals Clearance by Henry Parland, as well as the upcoming With Deer by Aase Berg and Collobert Orbital by Johan Jonsson. His own books include: A New Quarantine Will Take My Place, Pilot and Dear Ra.

~~~~

Fredrik Nyberg is a Swedish poet born in 1968, currently living in Göteborg, Sweden. In 2007, Ugly Duckling Presse published a translation of his début collection, A Different Practice (En annorlunda praktik), originally published by Norstedts Förlag in 1998. Subsequent books include Blomsterur – förklaringar och dikter (Clockwork of Flowers – Explanations and Poems, 2000), Åren (The Years, 2002), and Det blir inte rättvist bara för att båda blundar (It won’t be fair just because both shut their eyes, 2006). In 2003, Nyberg wrote the play Tunnelsång (Tunnel Song), commissioned by Gothenburg’s Cinnnober Theater with the mission to stimulate and develop contemporary Swedish drama. His introduction to Erik Beckman’s Collected Poems was published in January of 2007, as was the children’s book Pandi and the Camel Meet the Meerkats, a collaboration with Lotta Magnusson Nyberg. Nyberg serves on the editorial board of the Swedish literary publication OEI, and is one half (composer/musician Lars Carlsson is the other) of the text/sound duo MonoMono. Translations of his poetry have appeared in The Chicago Review, The Literary Review, Calque, Circumference, and Action, Yes. A new collection – Nio, nine, nein, neuf – is forthcoming from Norstedts in the fall of 2008.

~~~~

Poet and translator Jennifer Hayashida was born in Oakland, CA, and grew up in the suburbs of Stockholm and San Francisco. She is the recipient of a 2008-2009 LMCC Workspace Residency, a 2007 PEN Translation Fund Grant, a Witter Bynner Poetry Translator Residency at the Santa Fe Art Institute, and has been a Fellow at the MacDowell Colony. She is the translator of Fredrik Nyberg’s A Different Practice (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2007) and Eva Sjödin’s Inner China (Litmus Press, 2005). Her poems and translations have appeared in The Chicago Review, Calque, Circumference, The Literary Review, Insurance, The Asian Pacific American Journal, and Action, Yes; text-based work has been included in group exhibitions at The Vera List Center for Art and Politics and Artists Space. She received her MFA in writing from Bard College in 2003. She currently lives in Brooklyn, and is Director of the Asian American Studies Program at Hunter College.

~~~~

stain
766 grand street
brooklyn, ny 11211
(L train to Grand Street,
1 block west)
718/387-7840
open daily @ 5 p.m.

~~~~

Hosted by Amy King and Ana Bozicevic

~~~~

Advertisements

Friday, July 25, 2008 @ 7:00 p.m.
July 3, 2008

July 25th @ 7 p.m. – Stain Bar – Williamsburg, Brooklyn

** Baker, Cordelli, Field, Need, Newton, and Tonelli**

~~~~

Andrea Baker is the author of like wind loves a window (Slope Editions,
2005) and the chapbooks gilda (Poetry Society of America, 2004) and true
poems about the river go like this (Cannibal Books, 2008).

~~~~

Phil Cordelli cleans lawns, carries on a love affair with the
tuliptrees of Upper Manhattan that may not be carrying on for much
longer now, and acts as a conduit for poetic impulses from the plant
world. More on this as it develops.

~~~~

Farrah Field‘s first book, Rising, is forthcoming in early 2009 by
Four Way Books. Her poems have appeared in many publications such as
the Mississippi Review, Margie, Chelsea, The Massachusetts Review,
Typo, Harp & Altar, and are forthcoming in Pebble Lake Review, Another
Chicago Magazine, Fulcrum, and 42Opus. She lives in Brooklyn.

~~~~

Originally from Massachusetts, David Need lives in Durham, NC and works as an
instructor in the Religion Department at Duke, teaching classes on Buddhism,
South Asian Religions, and Religion and Poetry. Recent and upcoming
publications include several suites published in Fascicle 2 & 3, a
translation/essay series on Rg Veda poetry in Talisman, an excerpt from “Places
I’ve Lived” upcoming in Minor American, and excerpts from “St. John’s Rose
Slumber” upcoming in Effing and Hambone. Several years ago Mipoesis ran a
series of essays by David on Rilke and three short memoir pieces, and Ocho ran
yet another sonnet suite. Current projects include a long poem written
alongside the Gospel of Mark, “Places I’ve Lived”, which is evolving into an
open ended project, finalizing a collection of translations of Rilke’s French
poetry, and yet another Rg Veda essay, this one on the theme of twins there and
in the poetry of Nate Mackey. David is associated with the NC lucipo poets, and
lives with his scholar wife and four cats.

~~~~

Keith Newton edits the online magazine Harp & Altar. His poems and
translations have appeared in Harvard Review, Cannibal, Typo, and
Circumference, among other journals, and a chapbook of his work is
forthcoming in 2008 from Cannibal Books. He lives in Brooklyn.

~~~~

Chris Tonelli lives in the Boston area where he runs The So and So Series. He has work forthcoming in Saltgrass, Salt Hill, Absent, and Good Foot, and is the author of three chapbooks: For People Who Like Gravity and Other People (Rope-A-Dope Press, forthcoming), A Mule-Shaped Cloud (w/ Sarah Bartlett, horse less press, 2008), and WIDE TREE: Short Poems (Kitchen Press, 2006).

~~~~

stain
766 grand street
brooklyn, ny 11211
(L train to Grand Street,
1 block west)
718/387-7840
open daily @ 5 p.m.

~~~~

Hosted by Amy King and Ana Bozicevic

~~~~

Friday, September 26, 2008 @ 7:00 p.m.
July 3, 2008

September 26th @ 7 p.m. – Stain Bar – Williamsburg, Brooklyn

** Bajandas, Grenier, Maxwell, Reines, Shmailo, & Virgil **

~~~~

Arpine Konyalian Grenier is a poet turned scientist and musician. Her work has appeared in How2, Columbia Poetry Review, The Iowa Review, Phoebe, Big Bridge, diode and elsewhere, including several anthologies. Part, Part Euphrates (NeO Pepper Press, 2007) is her latest publication.

~~~~

Kristi Maxwell currently lives and writes in Cincinnati. She’s the author of Realm Sixty-Four (Ahsahta, 2008), Elsewhere & Wise (Dancing Girl Press, 2008), and Hush Sessions (Saturnalia, forthcoming in 2009).

~~~

Alan Bajandas (far right)

Alan Bajandas was picked up hitchhiking two days ago by a pain pill-popping Italian-American bounty hunter named Jason. Jason—a self-professed Wiccan, former Marine sniper, 23-year mixed martial arts master, widower, and lover of transsexual women—was on his way to Knoxville, TN to persuade his drunk-driving father back to rehab by means of “a very large firearm.” Jason had a heart of pure fucking gold and bought Alan a Smart Water. Alan was born and raised in Texas and will soon return to Brooklyn where he now resides. He is editor of The Open Face Sandwich, a print annual of uncommon and unpublishable prose.

~~~~

Ariana Reines is the author of The Cow (Alberta Prize, FenceBooks 2006) and Coeur de Lion (Mal-O-Mar 2007). Two volumes of translation will appear in 2009: My Heart Laid Bare by Charles Baudelaire, for Mal-O-Mar, and Carnet de bal d’une courtisane by Griselidis Real, for Semiotext(e). She is under commission with The Foundry Theatre in New York, making a play that will premiere in January 2009.

~~~~

Larissa Shmailo’s new chapbook is A Cure for Suicide (Cervena Barva Press 2008), and new poetry CD is Exorcism (SongCrew 2008). Larissa has been published in Fulcrum, Rattapallax, Drunken Boat, MiPoesias, and other publications. Larissa translated the Russian Futurist opera Victory over the Sun by A. Kruchenych; a DVD of the original English-language production is part of the collection of the New York Museum of Modern Art. She also contributed translations to the anthology Contemporary Russian Poetry published by Dalkey Archive Press. Larissa Shmailo is a director of TWiN Poetry, an informal international collective of recording poets and their listeners and a public coordinator for the annual Fulcrum. Her first poetry CD, The No-Net World (SongCrew 2006) has been heard on radio and Internet broadcasts across the U.S. and the U.K. Larissa is listed in the Poetry Kit Who’s Who in poetry.

~~~~

Erin Virgil is an MFA student at Naropa University. For money she writes the greetings in campy greeting cards and moonlights as a bad secretary. Besides the front page in a Steve McQueen calendar, she has not published any writing lately.

~~~~

stain
766 grand street
brooklyn, ny 11211
(L train to Grand Street,
1 block west)
718/387-7840
open daily @ 5 p.m.

~~~~

Hosted by Amy King and Ana Bozicevic

~~~~

Friday, October 24, 2008 @ 7:00 p.m.
July 3, 2008

October 24th @ 7 p.m. – Stain Bar – Williamsburg, Brooklyn

** Browning, Cohen, Herron, Howe, Rumble, and Svalina **

~~~

Sommer Browning has a chapbook out with horse less press called Vale
Tudo and another on the rise with Cue Editions. Forklift, Ohio, New
York Quarterly, Open Letters Monthly, Free Verse and other journals
have published her poems. She lives and loves in Brooklyn.

~~~

Julia Cohen has three chapbooks available. “The History of a Lake Never Drowns” from Dancing Girl Press and “Chugwater” (with Mathias Svalina) from Transmission Press are forthcoming this year. Her poems have been published in Denver Quarterly, Copper Nickel, Bird Dog, Spinning Jenny, RealPoetik, Forklift, Ohio, MiPOesia, and GutCult amongst others. Her blog: www.onthemessiersideofneat.blogspot.com.

~~~

Patrick Herron (http://patrickherron.com) is a poet, musician, artist and information scientist living in Chapel Hill. His doll Lester is the author of the book _Be Somebody_ (http://effingpress.com/lester.htm) published in April 2008 by Effing Press (a 2003 review from Ron Silliman here: http://tinyurl.com/3e8es). Patrick is the author of several other books of poetry including _The American Godwar Complex_ (2004, BlazeVox, download in full for free at http://tinyurl.com/22fsn5). His web art & poetry has appeared in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and the New Museum for Contemporary Art (NYC). Pitchfork recently reviewed his electronic music composed under the moniker of “Blindfolder” (http://tinyurl.com/yntjfk). You may find some of Patrick‘s poems and essays in _The Exquisite Corpse_, _Jacket_, _Fulcrum_, _A Chide’s Alphabet_, and _Talisman_. He is the founder of the Carrboro Poetry Festival, a member of the board of Carolina Wren Press, and former Carrboro Poet Laureate. At Duke University Patrick serves as Research Analyst and Technologist for the Jenkins Chair where he studies global innovation networks, teaches new media studies, and builds text analysis & visualization tools.

~~~

Brian Howe is a freelance arts journalist and poet living in Durham, NC. His poems and sound art have appeared in Fascicle, Octopus, Apocryphal Text, Listenlight, Effing Magazine, Soft Targets, Cannibal, MiPO, Word for/ Word, and elsewhere. Howe is the author of two chapbooks, Guitar Smash (3rdness Press; 2006) and Foreign Letter (Beard of Bees; forthcoming in 2008). He is the creator of the electro-poetic project Glossolalia (http://glossolalia-blacksail.blogspot.com/) and a member of the Lucifer Poetics Group.

~~~

Ken Rumble is the author of Key Bridge (Carolina Wren Press, 2007) and President Letters (Scantily Clad Press, forthcoming.) His poems and reviews have appeared in Cutbank, Typo, Coconut, the tiny, Minor American, Talisman, and others. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina.

~~~

Mathias Svalina is the co-editor of Octopus Magazine & Books. He is the author of the chapbooks Why I Am White (Kitchen Press), Creation Myths (New Michigan Press), The Viral Lease (forthcoming from Small Anchor Press) &, written in collaboration with Julia Cohen, When We Broke the Microscope (Small Fires Press). His first book, Destruction Myth, is forthcoming from Cleveland State University Press in 09.

~~~~

stain
766 grand street
brooklyn, ny 11211
(L train to Grand Street,
1 block west)
718/387-7840
open daily @ 5 p.m.

~~~~

Hosted by Amy King and Ana Bozicevic

~~~~

Friday, November 21, 2008 @ 7:00 p.m.
July 3, 2008

November 21st @ 7 p.m. – Stain Bar – Williamsburg, Brooklyn

** Carnahan, Cassimassima, Grinnell, Lederer, Oberman, and Rohrer **

Special Musical Guest @ Intermission: Addenda

~~~

Brooklyn resident Kerry Carnahan has co-authored and edited a number of publications, including the New York City High Performance Infrastructure Guidelines, Cool and Green Roofs, and Sustainable Urban Sites (forthcoming), and is working towards her MFA in poetry from CUNY-Hunter College.

~~~


Christophe Cassimassima is co-editor of AMBIT : Journal of Poetry and Poetics and founder of Furniture_press in Baltimore. He hosts a monthly reading series in Baltimore at One West Cafe of the same name. Cassimassima’s chapbook Mov/ment[s] was released last October, and his book, The Proteus, appeared in early 2008. His work has also or will appear in Word For/Word, Generator, Eratio, X-Pressed, and Can We Have Our Ball Back?

~~~

E. Tracy Grinnell is the author of Some Clear Souvenir (O Books, 2006) and Music or Forgetting (O Books, 2001), as well as the limited edition chapbooks Leukadia (Trafficker Press, forthcoming 2008), Quadriga, a collaboration with Paul Foster Johnson (gong chapbooks, 2006), Of the Frame (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs, 2004), and Harmonics (Melodeon Poetry Systems, 2000). She lives in Brooklyn and edits Litmus Press and its annual journal of poetry and translation, Aufgabe.

~~~

Katy Lederer

Katy Lederer is the author of the poetry collections, Winter Sex (Verse Press, 2002) and The Heaven-Sent Leaf (BOA Editions, forthcoming 2008 ) as well as the memoir Poker Face: A Girlhood Among Gamblers (Crown, 2003), which Publishers Weekly included on its list of the Best Nonfiction Books of 2003 and Esquire Magazine named one of its eight Best Books of the Year 2003.

Her poems and prose have appeared in The American Poetry Review, Boston Review, Harvard Review, GQ, and elsewhere. She has been anthologized in Body Electric (Norton), From Poe to the Present: Great American Prose Poems (Scribner), and Isn’t It Romantic? (Verse Press), among other compilations.

Educated at the University of California at Berkeley and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she serves as a Poetry Editor of Fence Magazine. Her honors and awards include an Academy of American Poets Prize, fellowships from Yaddo (2001; 2004; 2005), MacDowell (2007), and the New York Foundation for the Arts (2005-2006), and a Discover Great New Writers citation from Barnes & Noble’s Discover Great New Writers Program.

~~~

Matthew Rohrer is the author of five books, most recently RISE UP, published by Wave Books. He teaches at NYU in the creative writing program, and lives in Brooklyn.

~~~

Miller Oberman was the 2005 recipient of Poetry Magazine’s Ruth Lilly Fellowship
and has recently had poems in Bloom Magazine, the Minnesota Review,
and Lilith. Miller lives in Brooklyn with Zero Oberman.

~~~~

SPECIAL INTERMISSION GUEST

While Addenda is just beginning, there’s a history. Dan Sofaer and Christopher Anderson first met when Christopher was the singer in the Washington, D.C. band Nine Men Are Suicides. After being musical director for the recording of the one song the band knew how to play (Sister Ray by the Velvet Underground), Dan went on to be a founding member of the Silence After and Christopher rejoined him in ’88 for the short-lived Hurricane Daisy, whose killer demo had Fugazi’s Don Zientara for its producer. After years in the wilderness, Dan reemerged as bassist in the San Francisco trio Giant Haystacks, and Christopher posted some Prince covers on MySpace. A chance note from Japan has reunited them, and they’re ready to bring the spirit to the letter.

You can find their music at myspace.com/addenda

~~~~

stain
766 grand street
brooklyn, ny 11211
(L train to Grand Street,
1 block west)
718/387-7840
open daily @ 5 p.m.

~~~~

Hosted by Amy King and Ana Bozicevic

~~~~

WOM-PO and Walt Whitman
May 3, 2008

In a scene dubbed “a bit too precious” by one reviewer, an excerpt from Walt Whitman’s poem, “Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking” makes an appearance in the excellent film, L.I.E., above.

And separately, I have been graciously granted, by Annie Finch, the Women’s Poetry Listserv moderator title that she has worn many years now:

The WOM-PO (Discussion of Women’s Poetry) List was started in December 1997 by Annie Finch with an invitation to a small group of poets, critics, and lovers of women’s poetry. These people in turn invited other people to join, and the list has grown gradually by spreading through these networks. In April 2008, Amy King succeeded Annie as List Moderator for WOM-PO. Discussion on the list covers women poets of all periods, aesthetics, and ethnicities. It has been characterized by its high caliber, relatively low volume, and openness to a diversity of aesthetic perspectives.

Thanks, Annie! And friendly interlopers, please feel free to join us!

~~~

Not One, But a Lovely Two!
April 17, 2008

http://amyking.files.wordpress.com/2008/04/two-go-walking-alice-and-gertrude-and-basket-maybe2.jpg

Brandi Homan reviews I’M THE MAN WHO LOVES YOU in The Cutbank Review today (an excerpt):

Even though King does something that there should be more of in contemporary poetry—addresses the sociopolitical aspects of life in the 21st century head on—I’m The Man Who Loves You accomplishes much more. It is disjointed, beautifully grotesque, and unsparing, yet it is ultimately hopeful, kind, and entertaining. In “I Used to Be Amy King,” King says, “…we are bred to be the best neglected fun, forthcoming” (32). Believe you me, King is this type of fun. I’m The Man Who Loves You is not to be neglected. This book is for anyone who has ever stepped into, or wanted to step into, their own “long black dream.”

Thanks, Brandi!

~~~

And Caroline Wilkinson reviews KISS ME WITH THE MOUTH OF YOUR COUNTRY over at Tarpaulin Sky (an excerpt):

Kiss Me with the Mouth of Your Country is a potent work not only artistically but politically, more so than King’s earlier poetry. Instead of loaded words, we get moments that bring us into a body where the borders shift. In this “country,” the “I” and “you” suddenly change because the line between the two keeps moving. The borders here are insecure because they are defended by private, piecemeal methods—“a pile of ash / that blows back into you.” This “country” is the body of a woman, and it stubbornly remains in quotes because it is a permeable thing, especially when trapped inside the home. Laws about rape and incest, ineffectual in practice, help keep it that way, as does the sexist culture. As a country, this body looks real enough, but because its borders don’t mean a great deal, it isn’t. Near the end of the chapbook, King returns to her earlier more cerebral style, turning images at a manic rate, but this idea of the body and its borders lingers. The poetry is haunted by it, like a house haunted by the idea of not being there.

Thanks, Caroline!

~~~

Ron Padgett Sings His Poetry!
April 11, 2008

Poet Ron Padgett with Poet John Ashbery

April 5, 2008

This week on A Prairie Home Companion, we’re setting up our giant radio antenna atop the historic Town Hall in New York City for three shows in April. This week’s special guests include, the phenomenon in boots and a hat, Brad Paisley, American film actress Kimberly Williams-Paisley, poet Ron Padgett, and the subject of more email inquiries at APHC than anyone else, legendary Scottish folk-singer Jean Redpath. Also with us, The Royal Academy of Radio Actors: Tim Russell, Sue Scott, and Fred Newman, The Guy’s All-Star Shoe Band, and The News from Lake Wobegon. Join us this week from action-packed West 43rd & Broadway.

Segment 1
00:00 Logo
00:11 Tishomingo Blues
03:48 It’s Only a Cyber Moon
06:09 Rhubarb script
10:09 “Caterpillar Cakewalk” – Shoe Band and Brad Paisley
13:10 GK intros Ron Padgett
14:48 Ron Padgett reads “The Drink”, “Poet As A Mortal Bird”, “Haiku” and “Morning”
18:50 “April Come She Will”- GK/ Pat/ Shoes
21:00 Jump script
22:19 GK intros Jean Redpath
24:15 “If You Could Wait A Moment Longer” – Jean Redpath and Shoe Band
28:06 Jean intros next tune
29:10 “Mally Lee” – Jean Redpath with the Guy’s All-Star Shoe Band
31:11 Powdermilk Biscuit Break
Segment 2
32:45 Guy Noir script
48:54 GK intros Brad Paisley
49:42 “I’m Still A Guy” – Brad Paisley
53:13 Brad Paisley talks to crowd
53:46 “Waiting on a Woman”- Brad Paisley
57:03 Intermission- “Somebody Stole My Gal”
Segment 3
1:01:15 Bob Elliott script
1:05:23 Sonnet Contest Announcement
1:06:17 Bob’s Bank script
1:07:50 Subway script
1:09:10 Greetings
1:12:56 “Cruisin’ Downtown” – Shoe Band and Brad Paisley
1:15:30 GK intros Ron Padgett
1:16:02 Ron Padgett recites “Dead or Alive in Belgium”, “Words From the Front” and “Bastille Day”
1:20:00 “Say You Love Me Sadie” – Shoe Band
1:20:35 GK intros Brad Paisley
1:22:16 “Ode de Toilet”- Brad Paisley
1:26:00 “Letter To Me” – Brad Paisley
Segment 4
1:31:00 The News from Lake Wobegon (Download MP3)
Segment 5
1:44:20 “The Old Woman”- Jean Redpath
1:46:23 “Steal Away” – Jean Redpath and Garrison Keillor
1:49:30 Indie script
1:54:05 Online
1:56:50 Credits, “Next Time I’m in Town” closer

Never a More Generous Man
April 3, 2008

the-comebacks-exoskeleton-matthew-rotando.jpg

Never a more generous man have I met than poet and friend, Matthew Rotando. I take great pleasure in singing the praises of his first book of poems, THE COMEBACK’S EXOSKELETON. I wish you could all know him too, as you will find that once you fall in love with this collection, you will long to meet the person who has such zest for life as well as an eye not afraid to behold our evils. It’s really a lovely collection — and I’m not just saying that because I’ve been waiting for years for it to appear. You should throw caution to the wind and take up this EXOSKELETON! Discover how well dresses up your own worldview!

What others are saying:

Incorporating the density of Spanish surrealism and a sprawling Whitmanesque line, this amazing first book finds Rotando engaged in a poetic biathlon which draws equally from maximal and minimal traditions. There are tight, economical poems, free verse forms derived from the sonnet, poems leaping about the page, but my favorites are the wonderful prose poems tumbling over and under themselves toward gnomish statements that feel both didactic and self-parodying. –Tim Peterson, from the Foreword

The rich, exultant writing in Matthew Rotando’s first collection is both comic and cosmic. Lyrics steeped in the Latin American literary tradition disclose what might be called the surreality of reality in contemporary American culture, while cadences of Stein and Barthelme make the prose poems in The Comeback’s Exoskeleton ring with laughter of great philosophical depth. This is a writer unafraid to love and to err, and to do so with irrepressible grace and humour. To read such unapologetically joyous work is a tonic for melancholy and a prescription for wonder. –Srikanth Reddy, Facts for Visitors


And a few short poems from the collection, though there are many longer ones to gleefully sink into:

THE OCTOPUS MAN, TO HIS SON

 

Son, watch the way the eaves bend when you breathe.

They move the way a star would

If you could corral water into spheres.

 

Shadows play in the paint under the floor:

Tentacular spirits!

They will hold your cages and laboratory equipment.

 

Your time as a human is near at hand;

I am repealing all the old regulations

Regarding prostrations and guttural pronouncements.

 

There will be things called Souvenir Shops;

Bring back an “I ♥ Mt. Rushmore” keychain for your mother.

 

~~

 

TOM DEVANEY, LON CHANEY

 

I snave this heaking suspicion

That the poung yoet, Tom Devaney,

Is really the mold oviestar, Lon Chaney.

If lou yisten to the way they laugh,

Or notice their hartling, storror movie eyes,

You’ll sefinitely dee

That they’re both obvious dasters of misguise.

 

 

AMY, I’M GOING TO CALL YOU THE TROUBLE GIRL

 

I like trouble. I like to shoot watermelon seeds at passing barges. I wanna

put Elmer’s Glue in your hair and make it stick straight up. I wanna go

down to the docks and kick some ass! Your shoes small like skunk. And

so do mine. If we were lizards, I bet we would both be geckoes with

sticky round fingers. A friend is someone who decides to find you out.

Let’s have a broken bottle party! A Chinese dude, Shih-Wu, said, “Pine

trees and strange rocks remain unknown to those who look for mind

with mind.” So let’s not bother. Let’s just walk arm in arm through a

crumbling metropolis, clacking castanets.

 

–From THE COMEBACK’S EXOSKELETON by Matthew Rotando

 

 

In the mood for one more? Try this one, complete with a nearly naked pic!

☻☺☻☺☻☺

Daisy Fried’s Poetry Exercises
April 2, 2008

amy-king-and-daisy-fried.jpg

Daisy Fried on Poetry:

* I’ve never found an explanation for why poetry, apparently alone among the art forms, is asked to do more than be itself.

* But poetry’s the High Art which is also democratic: inexpensive, portable, reproducible, quickly consumed (except for epic and very difficult poetry), requiring only literacy to participate. So maybe it’s good that poetry carries this extra burden, even if it means that the idea of poetry is more necessary to people than individual poems, and that people tend not to pay attention to what’s happening on the page. But this doesn’t explain why the superfluous demands are often made by educated poetry experts. I doubt most poets, good and bad, political or not, put these demands on their own work. Why should we make them of poetry in general?

* Words matter. Use is not function. War and Peace makes an excellent paperweight; I’ve used it that way myself, after reading it. The function of War and Peace is greater than its many uses. So too poetry. Bad poems are often more useful for healing, persuasion, and celebration than good ones. They lack that rich ambiguity which Keats called negative capability, and so fail as poems. Take, for example, bad 9/11 poems, at which I do “sniff the air.” There are good 9/11 poems. The degraded Romanticism of the mass of bad ones often amounts to decorative displays of the poet’s own sensibility. Such displays may be emotionally or politically useful, but who needs them? They seem to claim authenticity for individual experiences derived from watching TV—and fail to ask the question, why do these people want to kill us? Good 9/11 poems sustain the possibility that America was both victim and guilty. I believe 9/11 solace poetry has given support, however indirectly and unintentionally, to the Bush administration. Solace poetry is to serious poetry as pornography is to serious art. Sex pornography has its uses, even positive ones, but nobody confuses it with serious art about love. The difference between solace porn and sex porn is that solace pornographers seldom seem aware that they’re making pornography. Shame on them.* Poetry matters. Great poems don’t always fit categories of usage: Martial’s hilariously filthy invectives, Dickinson’s apolitical lyrics, and, despite their stupid fascism, Pound’s Cantos, all function as great poetry. Meanwhile, the four of us write poems. We might begin by intending to be merely useful (I never have). But at some point the poem takes over, makes requirements of us instead of vice versa. That’s the moment of poetry; poems exist to let readers share in that moment. So our focus on mere use strikes me as odd: is this really all we know about our poems? Why exclude ourselves from our own readership?

* Enjoyment matters. Poetry is fun! I mean this seriously. In “Lapis Lazuli,” Yeats insists on the gaiety of human existence alongside its tragedy. Yes, there is terrible suffering; we are all going to die. And when, on the carved lapis lazuli, a man “asks for mournful melodies;/Accomplished fingers begin to play;/…their eyes,/Their ancient, glittering eyes, are gay.” The gaiety of great poetry reinforces and deepens our humanity. That’s personal—and therefore social. Forget that, and we forget poetry’s true function.

–from “Does Poetry Have a Social Function” @ The Poetry Foundation

~~~

ALSO, listen in on a conversation I had with Daisy Fried HERE: powered by ODEO

~~~

A POEM A DAY BY DAISY FRIED

1. Write a ten-line poem in which each line is a lie.

2. Write a poem that tells a story in 18 lines or less, and includes at least four proper nouns.

3. Write a poem that uses any of the senses EXCEPT SIGHT as its predominant imagery.

4. Write a poem inspired by a newspaper article you read this week.

5. Write a poem without adjectives.

6. Ask your roommate/neighbor/lover/friend/mother/anyone for a subject (as wild as they want to make it) for a ten-minute poem. Now write a poem about that subject in ten minutes; make it have a beginning, a middle and an end.

7. Write the worst poem you possibly can. Now edit it and make it even worse.

8. Poem subject: A wind blows something down. Or else it doesn’t. Write it in ten minutes.

9. Write a poem with each line, or at least many of the lines, filling in the blanks of “I used to________, but now I_________.”

11. Write a poem consisting entirely of things you’d like to say, but never would, to a parent, lover, sibling, child, teacher, roommate, best

friend, mayor, president, corporate CEO, etc.

12. Write a poem that uses as a starting point a conversation you overheard.

13. First line of today’s poem: “This is not a poem, but…”

14. Write a poem in the form of either a letter or a speech which uses at least six of the following words: horses, “no, duh,” adolescent, autumn

leaves, necklace, lamb chop, Tikrit, country rock, mother, scamper, zap, bankrupt. Take no more than 13 minutes to write it.

15. Write a poem which includes a list or lists-shopping list, things to do, lists of flowers or rocks, lists of colors, inventory lists,

lists of events, lists of names…

16. Poem subject: A person runs where no running is allowed. Write it in ten minutes.

17. Write a poem in the form of a personal ad.

18. Write a poem made up entirely of questions. Or write a poem made up entirely of directions.

19. Write a poem about the first time you did something.

20. Write a poem about falling out of love.

21. Make up a secret. Then write a poem about it. Or ask someone to give you a made-up or real secret, and write a poem about it.

22. Write a poem about a bird you don’t know the name of.

23. Write a hate poem.

24. Free-write for, say, 15 minutes, but start with the phrase “In the kitchen” and every time you get stuck, repeat the phrase “In the

kitchen.” Alternatively, use any part of a house you have lots of associations with-“In the garage,” “In the basement,” “In the bathroom,” “In the yard.”

25. Write down 5-10 words that sound ugly to you. Use them in a poem.

26. Write a poem in which a motorcycle and a ballerina appear.

27. Write a poem out of the worst part of your character.

28. Write a poem that involves modern technology-voice mail, or instant messaging, or video games, or… 29. Write a seduction poem in which somebody seduces you.

30. Radically revise a poem you wrote earlier this month.